Anonymous said: Wait a minute! The Patron-Minette is meant to foil the Amis? How did I not see this? The members of the Patron Minette listed are: Babet, Claquesous, Montparnasse, Brujon, Gueulmer, Finistere, Kruideniers (Bizarro), Fauntleroy, and Mangedentelle. I just went through the book to find them. Do you know who each is supposed to be a foil of? I mean Montparnasse and Enjolras I picked up on (Terrible and capable of being charming/charming capable of being terrible). I think this needs to be discussed.

pilferingapples:

YOU DEAR GLORIOUS NONNY. THANK YOU FOR ASKING.

I don’t think it’s a 1:1 equivalence— most members of P-M aren’t given enough character to be much of anything. But  still think it scans SOMEWHAT, and part of that is because

well

I don’t think Montparnasse aligns with Enjolras at all.

FANDOM BLASPHEMY I KNOW, but wait!  hear me out!

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Super interesting meta here!

raresenses:

nappynomad:

socialjusticekoolaid:

The Ferguson City Council convened for the first time since Mike Brown’s death, and proved that they literally give no fucks about what the community has to say. Added to their vague, paltry proposed reforms, seems real change will have to come in Ferguson via the ballot box. I don’t care where you live folks— let this be a lesson in voting/participating in your local elections and government! #staywoke #farfromover 

My people getting it!

these people are the real heroes. not the military, not politicians, not the Hollywood actors. they risked their lives and livelihoods to challenge white supremacy and institutionalized racism.

flytely said: Eponine/Cosette & Pirate AU?

carmarthenfan:

whoops, more than three sentences

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I kind of really love this!

Net Neutrality: How To Submit Comments To The FCC

meeedeee:

 The info you submit will be public

1. Go to
2. Click on 14-28 
3. Comment “I want internet service providers classified as common carriers.”
4. Hit Confirm on the next page
5. Done

timechangegirl:

A poetic and artful umbrella, Komorebi is based on a Japanese expression that approximately translates to “sunshine filtering through foliage.”

THATS THE BEST THING AND I NEED IT

I don’t normally reblog “here is a pretty object with no source for where to purchase it” things, but OMG WANT.

*cough*

(Source: astarnomy)

carmarthenfan:

Bleargh I don’t even know how to do this without ripping you off, vouksen, I’m sorry! :-( Also I hope I didn’t soften up Favourite too much. Also SORRY MARIUS.
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Grisette fic!  Grisette fic that’s really good!

carmarthenfan:

Bleargh I don’t even know how to do this without ripping you off, vouksen, I’m sorry! :-( Also I hope I didn’t soften up Favourite too much. Also SORRY MARIUS.

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Grisette fic!  Grisette fic that’s really good!

melannen:

artificialities replied to your post: So I recently did some reading about W…

And now I’m picturing a fic in which they just drop into stuff that’s 3/4 impenetrable slang whenever they don’t want the people around them to understand. (Except I bet you could justify the Allspeech translating if you wanted.)

I am 100% sure that once Steve gets Bucky back it’s going to be all obscure 1920s-1940s pop culture references, all the time. Also they’re going to eventually get wise enough to start using things that Jarvis can’t even translate, like catchphrases from minor newspaper comics that haven’t been digitized or flash-in-the-pan pop songs with no surviving recordings. And, yes, SO MUCH impenetrable slang, whenever they don’t want people to understand, or whenever they just want to be annoying - I bet you could actually have quite a lot of really deep, emotional conversation about the psychological effects of combat using long-forgotton GI slang, and the SHIELD psychs are lost.

I really kind of love this entire idea.  It’s enough to make me wish I knew enough to write the fic.  (Probably not enough to make me do all the research to get able to write it, though.)

Especially because for a moment I read that sentence as talking about “the psychological effects of using long-forgotten slang” which… are probably not insignificant, either, under the circumstances.

pilferingapples:

The Victorian Avant-Garde from a Punk Rock Perspective

coolaccidents:

Looking at this:

image

I was forced to think quite hard about the phrase “avant garde”. At the time John Everet Millais painted it, it was considered quite a shocker. The story was racy and the straight leg bucked painting form and convention. The painting had proud echoes of medievalism. Not least of its sins was the (hard to see here) letters “PRB” (standing for ‘Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood’) carved into the leg of the bench upon which the girl sits.
 

It might be that these four

image

(Clockwise, you’re looking at William Holman HuntDante Gabriel RossettiJohn Everett Millais and Ford Madox Brown. )

appear to have more in common with Mumford & Sons than with John, Paul, Steve and (well Glen in this case)

image

but first impressions and facial hair can be a tricky business and rather deceiving at the best of times.

These four beardies were the enfant-terribles of 1850’s London and this was their NEVER MIND THE BOLLOCKS.
 

image
Christ in the House of His Parents, John Everett Millais, 1849-50


A statement of intent with at least the shock factor of Anarchy In The UK, God Save The Queen and No Fun.

At first it’s not that easy to see what all the fuss was about. After all, one of the sobering things about art (and music) is that at first it shocks and soon after it is at first recognised, then assimilated, then imitated, then the norm. I could digress at length about porn or Skrillex here but perhaps best not. So it’s difficult to look back and see why the fact that Jesus might actually be a carpenter shocked everyone so much.

But in fact these four - Holman Hunt, Millais, Rossetti and Ford Madox Brown – were every bit as militant as the Pistols. They were THE PRE-RAPHAELITE BROTHERHOOD! They had their own Malcolm McLaren (art critic John Ruskin) who was also their Caroline Coon (number one fan). They had their own identity – and tagged their work PRB so everyone knew it. They had their own “old guard” to abuse and shock (Sir Sloshua Reynolds as they taunted the leading artist of the time) and like the best Rock Stars they partied like bad muthafuckas. Wine drinkers to a man, they consorted with prostitutes, swapped wives and lovers, treated their models as both muses and whores (Millais left his in a cold bath so long whilst painting Ophelia she caught pneumonia and nearly died), did mad things (Rossetti buried his poems with his wife when she died, then had to exhume her when he ran out of ideas to get them back), wrote bad poetry, had Christian epiphanies in the desert and overdosed (Lizzie Siddle, Rossetti’s wife & model, died of Laudanum poisoning).

More importantly they also had their own manifesto to affirm their belief that Raphael had fucked up modern art since and that a return to medievalism would help route a way to something new, and even if (4.) does seem a bit obvious, here it is nonetheless just as they published it

  1. to have genuine ideas to express
  2. to study Nature attentively, so as to know how to express them
  3. to sympathise with what is direct and serious and heartfelt in previous art, to the exclusion of what is conventional and self-parodying and learned by rote
  4. most indispensable of all, to produce thoroughly good pictures and statues

And like Punk rock with music,  they changed the face of art to come.

But as you wander through room upon room of polite landscapes and Shakespeare and Dante derived subjects in a new huge retrospective of their work, superficially it is hard to get excited – until suddenly you stumble over this stunning portrait of “Mariana” (well ok, that’s taken from Shakespeare too but it’s a great picture of a woman at work stretching with a visual richness that’s stunning)

image
Mariana, John Everett Millais, 1851
 

And then onto Ophelia in her custom made Gold frame, and realise that here is the direct route to Klimt’s “The Kiss”

image
Ophelia, John Everett Millais, 1851-52
 

It is as if Millais (these are both his and he’s by far the best painter on show) has suddenly flicked the switch and the “Spunk” demos became “Never Mind The Bollocks”.

After that it’s as if the whole group hit a groove with classic after classic and everyone’s in on it. Suddenly the mundane becomes great and stuff like this amazing, early-socialist polemic (“work”) by Ford Madox Brown starts to appear.

image
Work, Ford Madox Brown, 1865
 

The painting sort of locates him as the Joe Strummer of the piece. An extreme allegory of socialism is a slew of images and metaphors (aristocrats and wasters in the shadows, honest workers to the forefront, philosophers to the right) in which even the dogs have a story to tell probably relates closely to something on the third side of “Sandanista” if you think laterally (maybe?). Anyway I loved this one and for once polemic was a clear winner.

Its not all good and a lot of what follows in the exhibition is still pretty ordinary in fairness. Personally, I can happily live without the moral righteousness of “The Awakening”, in which a woman who actually looks as if the guy in the image has stuck his thumb (or something else) up her arse, apparently in fact suddenly realises she is a kept woman and that’s not ok.

image
The Awakening Conscience, John Everett Millais, 1851
 

While the below struck me as something like a KLF spoof tinged with some desert acid.

image
The Scapegoat, William Holman Hunt, 1854-56
 

But on the whole, you suddenly get a sense of why this lot actually did become pretty revered and somewhat justified a tag as “Avant Garde”. Their painting is broadly vital and energetic, and in it you see the end of an old formal style and a route to many of the changes that would emerge into the 20th century. Detail as a route to abstract is particularly evident.

But as you go the cracks also start to appear pretty much Punk rock style.

Here’s middle period Rossetti. He seemed to find a vibe painting pretty women and I personally liked this even if he’d pretty much sold the others down the river by then in a hunt to be more commercial (Rossetti as Adam Ant? Or Billy Idol?)

It’s true that this period for him is far better than his earlier more earnest attempts but it’s none the less far more commercial!

image
Lady Lillith, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1872-73
 

By then Rosetti had appropriated the movement’s name, dropped the sloganeering and was ready to get paid. It’s good but it’s not shocking any more. And neither is stuff like this by Burne-Jones (good though it is, and interesting in the way shape and form dominate)

image
The Golden Stairs, Edward Burne-Jones, 1876-80
 

The baton had really passed over to a new generation led by William Morris who espoused Arts & Crafts and developed into the new socialists and suffragettes and whose new art was “radical” in every sense

image

The original leaders of the movement shook off their wildness,  grew still bigger beards and got country houses. Like all good movements they chucked someone out as unworthy (James Collinson), had a scandal (Millais ran away with Ruskin’s wife), were venemously attacked by their older critics (“the clique”) as upstarts, dropped their PRB sloganeering and splintered. And, of course, all started making money!

They never, to my knowledge, reformed for a “filthy lucre” tour however. But it may be that Mclaren’s epitaph for the Pistols does as well for the PRB actually (and arguably any avant-gardistes):

“Poor boys. They just ran out of ideas. I told them Ideas? You ran out on us, you bastard where would you boys have been otherwise?”

And maybe that’s the sobering lesson about the Avant Garde. You just cannot be it forever!

[Pre Raphaelites: The Victorian Avant Garde is an exhibition currently running at the Tate Gallery in London. It’s good ‘til Christmas or so]

oilan:

artificialities replied to your post: Le Puy-en-Velay. Is this a good place …

That’s where I have him from, based on that name map thing! For what that’s worth.

:D Yay! Actually, after I saw your reply, I checked your fic and I’m not sure how I forgot that your Enjolras is from Le Puy-en-Velay, especially because it’s in the fic with him and Combeferre and the adorable fuzzy cows. <3 

Also: name map? Have I seen this before?

Uh, I’m not sure!  It was going around back when I was first starting to get into the fandom.  I have no idea where the tumblr post I got it from is, because… tumblr archiving basically isn’t, but here is the site!  You put in a surname (or first name), you pick which century you’re looking for, and it tells you where that name was commonly found.  It starts out as the world, but you can zoom in enough to view by département (in France; I don’t know if every country has that kind of granular data.)  Turns out in 1800, at least, there’s a REALLY REALLY SPECIFIC concentration of where people named Enjolras lived.

I picked Le Puy-en-Velay because Enjolras seems to me to be definitely a city boy, and it was the city in the region I could find out the most about and also it seemed pretty cool.

(The map is more useful for some names in Les Mis than others.  I tried Combeferre just now and got “surname not found” for the relevant centuries, but oh well.)

inonibird:

rufftoon replied to your post: anonymous said:Just something I’v…

And since hieroglyphs can be written both left to right or right to left, definitely handy.

image

(haha, that absolutely doesn’t say “The More You Know”; the best I could manage was “YOU KNOW MANY THINGS”, and I’m sure my grammar is atrocious X’D)

trynottodrown:

Someone asked about the greenland shark and how/why it’s poisonous so here you go:
TOXICITY AND TRIMETHYLAMINE (TMAO)
Water and dissolved solutes, including various salts, calcium chloride and sulphates, pass through a fish’s body (cells, tissues, and organs) in a process known as osmosis. Larger molecules inside the blood and tissue fluids of fishes and sharks, including proteins and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO*), also exert a contributory osmotic effect but they are too large to pass through the channels that govern salt balance.* By-product of the metabolic breakdown of proteins and amino acids.If the salt concentration in a fish’s tissues is lower than that of the surrounding water, its body will absorb salt from the environment until both levels become equal. If a marine fish swims up a freshwater river, the reverse phenomenon will occur and it will diffuse salt into the environment via specialised sodium secreting cells located primarily in gill tissue. In both cases, too much or too little salt is detrimental to most fish species because they can only survive within a specific range of salt concentrations. Fish that are thus restricted to either freshwater or seawater are known as stenohaline. Some species, such as salmon, are able to osmoregulate in varying levels of salinity. These fish are called euryhaline.When salt and other solutes enter a fish’s tissues, they force water out of the body. Since salt levels in marine fishes are lower than those of the surrounding environment, they must continually take in water and excrete salt through their gills. Salt levels in sharks are also lower than that of sea water but sharks manage osmosis differently. In order to maintain a stable amount of water in its body, the Greenland shark will retain a high concentration of urea in its blood, thus compensating for lower salt concentrations. However, because high levels of toxic urea will damage its body by destabilizing protein, the Greenland shark also retains even higher levels of trimethylamine oxide to counter the damaging effects of the urea. When the trimethylamine oxide and urea are combined with the salt in the shark’s tissues, the osmotic pressure of the shark’s body fluids is higher than that of the surrounding water. In other words, the shark is ‘saltier’ than seawater. Unlike bony fishes that must constantly take in water to replace water lost through osmosis, the Greenland shark does not need to expend energy to maintain life-sustaining water levels in its body.
In addition to contributing to the shark’s osmotic pressure, trimethylamine oxide and high levels of urea also serve as a natural antifreeze by stabilizing the enzymes and proteins in the Greenland shark’s tissues. When the shark encounters extremely deep and cold conditions, this prevents the formation of ice crystals that disrupt cell walls and cause the leakage of cellular contents, which results in tissue and organ damage, then death.When Greenland shark flesh is consumed, the digestive process turns trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) into trimethylamine (TMA), a substance that smells like ammonia and rotting fish. In addition to causing intestinal discomfort, trimethylamine also has adverse neurological effects akin to consuming excessive quantities of alcohol. Death may ensue in extreme cases when too much shark flesh has been consumed. Greenland shark flesh is nonetheless considered a delicacy in Iceland. 

trynottodrown:

Someone asked about the greenland shark and how/why it’s poisonous so here you go:

TOXICITY AND TRIMETHYLAMINE (TMAO)

Water and dissolved solutes, including various salts, calcium chloride and sulphates, pass through a fish’s body (cells, tissues, and organs) in a process known as osmosis. Larger molecules inside the blood and tissue fluids of fishes and sharks, including proteins and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO*), also exert a contributory osmotic effect but they are too large to pass through the channels that govern salt balance.

* By-product of the metabolic breakdown of proteins and amino acids.

If the salt concentration in a fish’s tissues is lower than that of the surrounding water, its body will absorb salt from the environment until both levels become equal. If a marine fish swims up a freshwater river, the reverse phenomenon will occur and it will diffuse salt into the environment via specialised sodium secreting cells located primarily in gill tissue. In both cases, too much or too little salt is detrimental to most fish species because they can only survive within a specific range of salt concentrations. Fish that are thus restricted to either freshwater or seawater are known as stenohaline. Some species, such as salmon, are able to osmoregulate in varying levels of salinity. These fish are called euryhaline.

When salt and other solutes enter a fish’s tissues, they force water out of the body. Since salt levels in marine fishes are lower than those of the surrounding environment, they must continually take in water and excrete salt through their gills. Salt levels in sharks are also lower than that of sea water but sharks manage osmosis differently. In order to maintain a stable amount of water in its body, the Greenland shark will retain a high concentration of urea in its blood, thus compensating for lower salt concentrations. However, because high levels of toxic urea will damage its body by destabilizing protein, the Greenland shark also retains even higher levels of trimethylamine oxide to counter the damaging effects of the urea. When the trimethylamine oxide and urea are combined with the salt in the shark’s tissues, the osmotic pressure of the shark’s body fluids is higher than that of the surrounding water. In other words, the shark is ‘saltier’ than seawater. Unlike bony fishes that must constantly take in water to replace water lost through osmosis, the Greenland shark does not need to expend energy to maintain life-sustaining water levels in its body.

In addition to contributing to the shark’s osmotic pressure, trimethylamine oxide and high levels of urea also serve as a natural antifreeze by stabilizing the enzymes and proteins in the Greenland shark’s tissues. When the shark encounters extremely deep and cold conditions, this prevents the formation of ice crystals that disrupt cell walls and cause the leakage of cellular contents, which results in tissue and organ damage, then death.

When Greenland shark flesh is consumed, the digestive process turns trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) into trimethylamine (TMA), a substance that smells like ammonia and rotting fish. In addition to causing intestinal discomfort, trimethylamine also has adverse neurological effects akin to consuming excessive quantities of alcohol. Death may ensue in extreme cases when too much shark flesh has been consumed. Greenland shark flesh is nonetheless considered a delicacy in Iceland. 

needsmoreresearch:

another joke archivists actually tell, even worse than Noah’s ark hives (if only because of the pronunciation):

Q. What’s green and belongs to all of us?

A. Our chives!

Anonymous said: I feel so useless sitting here. What can I do to help Ferguson??

bookelfe:

initforthefiction:

natnovna:

there’s a bail and legal fund that’s been set up for those who’ve been arrested 

this person is trying to organize a food drive for school kids in ferguson

national moment of silence 2014 (for victims of police brutality) 

share the following: 

videos of what has happened

links to articles

how to make a tear gas mask

livestream link to the peaceful protests

Ferguson Police Department
Email (taken off the site) 

222 S. Florissant Road
Ferguson, MO 63135

Ph: 314-522-3100
Fx: 314-524-5290

I’ve also seen the NAACP, ACLU (link goes to some of their posts about police militarization), and Southern Poverty Law Center floated as good donation options.

The NAACP has some specific recommendations for ways to help that don’t involve monetary donation, in case you’re not in a spot where that’s feasible for you.

Tossing in the link for the Michael Brown Memorial Fund as well, just to have them all in one place. 

oilan:

artificialities replied to your post: “Navel-gazing about writing, etc. Feel free to ignore. XD [[MOR] I…”:
I have no magical secrets, just enough years of seat-of-the-pants flailing to settle into a working style (of seat-of-the-pantsing), but if you want to chat characterization or writing sometime I’d totally be up for it. :)

YES I want to know all the things. What is your working process and how do you think about the characters and how do you flesh them out in your fics and make them believable?

This is why I love those writing memes where you send a writer one of their fics/an excerpt and they talk about the “behind the scenes” stuff. Learning how people work and think when creating fanwork is JUST SO COOL and so helpful. XD

Oh gad, see, we are in seat-of-the-pants flailing here!  My working process is UH I DO STUFF

No, okay.  This is an extremely individual answer that may or may not be of any use to anyone but me, and also may or may not be entirely coherent, but here are some scattered thoughts about how I write fic!

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pilferingapples:

eccecorinna:

pilferingapples:

image
oh man! would you like me to tell you about the moomins? I CAN TELL YOU ABOUT THE MOOMINS

YES THANK YOU I WOULD LIKE THAT VERY MUCH.:D

ALRIGHT HERE GOES

AS IT IS LATE THIS’LL BE RAMBLY BUT HERE’S WHY I LOVE THESE BOOKS

The Moomintroll books were written by Tove Jansson, mostly in the 1950s. She was a Swedish-speaking Finn so they were originally written in Swedish, but they’ve been translated into a bunch of languages since and are pretty popular throughout the world. Jansson was also an artist, so her books are full of drawings, and she also did a series of comics.

It’s hard to explain the Moomintroll books in terms of an overaching plot—they’re more a series of episodic vignettes about a set of characters she created. Sort of, fantasia over fantasy. The Moomin family and their friends live in Moominvalley, and they spend a lot of time having picnics, meeting new neighbors with interesting backstories, going out into nature to discover things, and having little adventures here and there. There’s a lot of build-your-own-raft-and-sail-to-this-island-and-go-camping stuff.

I’m gonna post the character pages from Tales From Moominvalley below, so you get an idea of the people you’ll meet:

image

image


Moomintroll’s parents are the sweetest. (Moominmamma’s full of good sense, and Moominpappa’s a bit of a capital-R Romantic Hipster, and hilariously so) Snufkin, Moomintroll’s best friend, is one of my favorite characters. And Little My is the Gavroche of the series, pretty much.

I also like that all the characters are so… bohemian and found familyish? It makes sense, because Jansson grew up in an artsy, bohemian family, and people were always coming and going. So you have a bunch of little creatures all doing their own weird quirky things. And everyone is unconventional. If there is a sign labeled Keep off the Grass? The characters will go and plant flowers there.

The small adventures in the books become the grounds for exploring all sorts of Big Emotions, though, and I’m forever impressed with the way Jansson treats ideas like love, longing, and wanderlust.

For instance, I mentioned above that Snufkin is one of my favorite characters. Snufkin spends half the year travelling on his own, when Moomintroll hibernates, and the other time visiting with the Moomins. He’s really charged by this time he spends alone, and it’s a huge part of his identity, which sometimes comes into conflict with how much he cares for Moomintroll. It doesn’t mean he cares for Moomintroll less, but it’s really nice to have a character whose affection for others and his need to spend time by himself are both considered valid. (Instead of like, he’s Doomed To Be A Loner, or he discovers that He Needs To Admit He Loooooves People And Spend More Time Around Them.)

I have an excerpt I typed up long ago that shows Snufkin’s Conflicted Feelings About Things, and I’ll reblog it just because.

As the books are Finnish, there’s a fair amount of Interaction With Nature and also The Soul’s Interaction With The Season of Winter (especially in Moominland Midwinter, my favorite book in the series.) But anyway. It’s all done quite well.

I feel like Jean Prouvaire would be a big fan of these books?

Incidentally, I didn’t read them until I was an adult, so I highly recommend them even if one didn’t grow up with them.

AW GOSH that is indeed adorable! Thank you, friend! :D

THIS FILLS ME WITH JOY; I love the Moomintrolls so muuuuch.  

I really should reread them, because I haven’t in years and years.  But they were totally formative for me, and my family quotes them still.